A patented method for high-throughput quantitative analysis of small but highly specific regions of the genome.

About

Summary

Developed by researchers from the Stanford Genome Technology Center, this technology is a patented method for high-throughput quantitative analysis of small but highly specific regions of the genome. Molecular inversion probes (MIPs) allow automated multiplex assays of genomic DNA markers (up to ~10,000 SNPs per assay) with a low likelihood of background error than previous PCR methods. The method can be applied to a variety of detection platforms including DNA arrays, mass spectrometry, and gel electrophoresis. MIPs are now widely used for SNP genotyping, copy number variant analysis, genome wide association studies.

 

Applications


Pharmacogenomics - genotyping of genes important in drug metabolism
Molecular diagnostics - genotyping of genes associated with disease
Genomic research - genotyping, haplotyping, copy number variant and genome wide association studies to identify genotype-phenotype correlations with disease states


 

Advantages


High throughput - genotypes ~10,000 SNP in a single tube assay
High specificity
Robust - DNA detection from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded samples and other samples that are prone to DNA degradation


 

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