• Provides early detection of tumour development in the bowel • Allows users to proactively monitor their Gastrointestinal (GI) and bowel health

About

Introduction

In the western world, colorectal cancer is now the third most frequent cancer and the second most common cause of cancer deaths. Worldwide an estimated 1.36 million new cases of bowel cancer were diagnosed in 2012. In the UK, around 15,000 people die from the disease each year.

Researchers at the University of Glasgow have developed auto-fluorescence imaging to be incorporated into wireless devices for gastrointestinal diagnosis . The technology will significantly increase the diagnostic modality of these types of pill cameras, leading to improved patient outcomes.

Fluorescence endoscopy is one of the most effective methods for early cancer detection in the GI tract. An endoscopy pill is required to inspect parts of the GI tract inaccessible to conventional endoscopes. A key component of this pill is an integrated SPAD array imager and interference optics for autofluorescence.

 

Fluorescence Technology

For fluorescence technology to be fitted in such a constrained environment, we have solved two problems; we have miniaturised the optics and devised a low power source and detector technology.

 

Low Cost, High Sensitivity Imager

The Research team has designed and implemented a single chip single photon avalanche detector based imager. The imager provides enhanced sensitivity, allowing low power illumination to be used. It contains integrated high voltage source technology, reducing the system chip count.

 

Key Benefits


Provides early detection of tumour development in the bowel
Allows users to proactively monitor their Gastrointestinal (GI) and bowel health
Improved compliance and screening response rate with elimination of sample collection


 

Applications

The Auto-Fluorescence Imaging sensor has the potential to be used in wireless devices for gastrointestinal diagnosis. This could add additional diagnostic utility to ingestible monitoring pills, which are growing in acceptance and use for direct imaging of the gastrointestinal tract, and replacing traditional endoscopy procedures.

 

Contact is welcomed from organisations interested in developing, licensing or exploiting this IP with a view to commercialisation.

 

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