A patented, simple, inexpensive, and reusable method to controllably couple quantum dots and other nanocrystals to photonic crystal cavities, fibers, or other photonic crystals.

About

Background:

Researchers at Stanford have developed a patented, simple, inexpensive, and reusable method to controllably couple quantum dots and other nanocrystals to photonic crystal cavities, fibers, or other photonic crystals or optical structures. The method can be used for the construction of low-cost, reusable single-photon sources operating at room temperature, or for the construction of simple and reusable light-emitting diodes (LEDs). It can also be used for nondestructive and simple testing of the properties of passive photonic crystals and other passive optical structures, as the emission from embedded quantum dots or nanocrystals can be used to probe spectral properties of the underlying passive structures. Additionally, it can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in biochemical sensing techniques employing colloidal quantum dots as markers.
The inventors are currently working on extending this technique to incorporate quantum dots emitting at 1550nm into silicon photonic crystal cavities, which could lead to a simple way of making silicon-based light sources and devices, and possibly even lasers.

 

Applications:

 

Construction of low-cost, reusable room temperature single-photon sources
Light-emitting diodes (LEDs):
construction of simple, reusable LEDs
increasing the light extraction efficiency
Nondestructive testing of the properties of passive photonic crystals and other passive optical structures
Biochemical sensing - improving the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in employing colloidal quantum dots as markers
Silicon-based light sources and devices for optical telecom devices and the silicon semiconductors

 

Advantages:

 

Simple and reusable
Inexpensive

 

Publications:

 

I. Fushman, D. Englund and J. Vuckovic, "Coupling of PbS Quantum Dots to Photonic Crystal Cavities at Room Temperature," Physics Optics, May 2005.
H. Benisty, "Photonic crystals: New designs to confine light," Nature Physics, Vol. 1, pp. 9-10 (Oct. 2005).
 

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