Canines may be hidden reservoirs for C. difficile and that the mechanisms of CDI resistance in the canine gut could provide insights into targeted therapeutics for human CDI.

About

Description: Marked by an increase in disease severity and recurrence since the early 2000s, Clostridioides difficile (Clostridium) infection (CDI) has rapidly become an emerging public health threat. Recent research in canines has explored the mechanisms and interactions responsible for resistance to C. difficile colonization in the healthy human gut and characterized the underlying bacterial communities responsible for this phenotype. These findings support asymptomatic carriage in canines and suggest features of the gut microbiome and/or a canine-specific immune response that protects against CDI. Two biologically relevant bacteria in the canine samples were identified that may aid in C. difficile resistance, which may be associated with regulating homeostasis in the canine gut.

Potential applications: Clinical applications to provide Clostridioides difficile resistance.

Benefits and advantages: This research suggests that canines may be hidden reservoirs for Clostridioides difficile and that the mechanisms of CDI resistance in the canine gut could provide insights into targeted therapeutics for human CDI.

Key Benefits

Benefits and advantages: This research suggests that canines may be hidden reservoirs for Clostridioides difficile and that the mechanisms of CDI resistance in the canine gut could provide insights into targeted therapeutics for human CDI.

Applications

Potential applications: Clinical applications to provide Clostridioides difficile resistance.

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