Allows for stratification of cystoscopic surveillance in order to prioritize high-risk patients for timelier cystoscopy while reducing frequency for low-risk patients.

About

Summary

Bladder cancer is the sixth most common malignancy in the U.S. It is currently diagnosed by cytology and cystoscopy, examination of the inner lining of the bladder, and typically managed by endoscopic resection. Because bladder cancer has a high recurrence rate it requires lifelong surveillance with cystoscopy which is invasive, uncomfortable and expensive.  
Several non-invasive bladder cancer detection tests are available but these tests frequently have unsatisfactory diagnostic performance, require complex sample preparation or have poor sensitivity for low grade cancer. 
To overcome these limitations Stanford researchers in Joe Liao’s lab have developed a non-invasive, urine-based panel of biomarkers for screening, diagnosis and monitoring bladder cancer. This panel is more accurate and sensitive than existing tests and can better stratify patients for cystoscopic surveillance.

 

Applications


Bladder cancer diagnosis and surveillance


 

Advantages


Urine-based
Good sensitivity for low grade tumors
Allows for stratification of cystoscopic surveillance in order to prioritize high-risk patients for timelier cystoscopy while reducing frequency for low-risk patients


 

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