Novel Food Grade Oxidation Systems

Unique ingredient technology and formulation capabilities across each link of the baking business value chain.

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AB Mauri are looking for oxidation systems or oxygen supply effective at later stages in the breadmaking process, for example up to 30 mins or one hour after hydration.

Summary

Background

AB Mauri is a global family of yeast and bakery ingredients companies operating in all parts of the world as a division of Associated British Foods plc. AB Mauri is a business devoted to the baking industry. With 52 plants, operations in 32 countries and sales in over 100, it is a truly global yeast and bakery ingredients business, supporting and enabling the world’s bakers, both small and large. AB Mauri has its global headquarters in the UK and has more than 7000 employees.

AB Mauri's bakery ingredients headquarters in the Netherlands, conducts research to develop future technologies to support the growth of the baking industry, both in bread and in sweet bakery product categories.

Challenge

AB Mauri are looking for oxidation systems or oxygen supply effective at later stages in the breadmaking process, for example up to 30 mins or one hour after hydration.

Controlling oxidation reactions is relevant for numerous applications, both in food systems and beyond. For example, stain removal in laundry processing or paint film formation both utilise oxidation reactions. In food systems, oxidation processes can be deleterious (requiring antioxidant control) but also sometimes beneficial, for example in generating the required protein structure, fatty acid composition or functional fibres to structure foods and control texture. However, often the best oxidation systems are not natural or food grade.

In breadmaking oxidation is needed during the dough making process. Oxidation is needed for the gluten proteins or the fibres to cross-link and form a strong and stable enough network which can hold the gas that is formed by the fermenting yeast.

One of the bottlenecks in this oxidation process is that molecular oxygen is rapidly depleted in fermenting bread dough by yeast and by various oxidation enzymes. These enzymes may have a positive effect on the gluten network, but their effect is too short-lived. Optimally, dough oxidation is not so much needed during mixing but would be more beneficial during proofing and even during early stages of baking.

What’s in it for you?

Successful innovators and experts are invited to collaborate in the final product development.

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